This article will explain how Workflows function specifically in respect to Permissions so that your Users have access to the desired Workflows.

Overview

Workflows are designed to assist the user navigation experience by allowing Users to seamlessly go from one task to the next when creating/editing records in Apricot. Please refer to our article specifically on Workflows for more detailed information including how to configure them.

When setting up a new Workflow you want to ensure that the desired Users have access so they are able to utilize the Workflow. In order for a User to have access to a Workflow, they must have permissions for all the forms and the appropriate actions selected for your Workflow.

Comparing your Workflow with Permissions

What is the point of a Workflow if your Users cannot access it?

The most important thing to keep in mind is that a User must have permissions for each Standard Form and every action for each form in order to access the Workflow. In other words, if a form is used in your Workflow with only a "Create" action, the User needs at minimum "Create" permissions for that form in either their Permission Set(Legacy Permissions) or Assigned Role(Role Based Permissions).

Next we will go over in more detail what this may look like. Below are screenshots of a basic Workflow and how the appropriate permissions will look for a User to be able to access this Workflow:

  1. User will need to have Create permissions for the Participant Profile form.

  2. User will need to have Create and Edit permissions for the Program Enrollment and Exit form.

  3. User will need to have Create and Edit permissions for the Workforce Assistance form.

Note: The Create record permission will automatically apply the View permission.

Permissions view for Legacy:

Permissions view for Role Based Permissions:

*IMPORTANT NOTE*

Any time a Workflow is updated with new steps or actions, it is advisable to double-check your permissions to make sure your desired Users continue to have access to the Workflow.

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